SEARCH THE COLLECTION:

event am rev rhb

Rebels, Redcoats, & Revolutionary Maps

Tuesday, September 8
6:00 - 8:00 pm
Abbey Room, Central Library in Copley Square

Richard Brown and Paul Cohen, coauthors of Revolution: Mapping the Road to American Independence, 1755–1783, explore the maps that reflect Boston’s role during the Revolutionary War period. Brown is Vice Chair of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center’s Board of Directors, and Cohen is a partner in Cohen & Taliaferro, dealers in rare books and antique maps. Following the talk, Ronald Grim, Leventhal Map Center curator, gives a tour of the exhibition We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence.

This program is presented by the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center and Boston Map Society.

This program is presented as part of Revolutionary Boston, a citywide commemoration. To see a full list of programs, visit www.bpl.org/revolution.

Revolutionary Boston(R) is the registered trademark of the Bostonian Society and is used by permission.

event salvatore

Author Talk: R.A. Salvatore

Saturday, September 12, 2015
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Commonwealth Salon

R.A. Salvatore speaks about world building and how geography and maps play a role in fantasy literature.

With over twenty million books sold in the U.S. alone, more than four dozen books, and numerous game credits, author R.A. Salvatore has become one of the most important figures in modern epic fantasy. Salvatore's first published novel, The Crystal Shard from TSR in 1988, became the first volume of the acclaimed Icewind Dale Trilogy. Since that time, Salvatore has published numerous novels for each of his signature multi-volume series including The Dark Elf Trilogy, Paths of Darkness, The Hunter's Blades Trilogy, and The Cleric Quintet.

A lifelong resident of Massachusetts, Salvatore spends a good deal of time encouraging people, particularly young people, to read. He is currently at work writing the next installment in the Legend of Drizzt, and also preparing a return to the World of Corona, the setting for his DemonWars novels and the RPG game he designed with his sons.

A book sale and author signing will immediately follow the talk. This program is presented in conjunction with the Literary Landscapes: Maps from Fiction exhibition currently on display in the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center through October 25.

event barber

North America in King George III’s World View

Monday, October 5, 2015
6:00 pm Talk, 7:00 pm Reception
Abbey Room, Central Library

Peter Barber will speak on The Colonies in Context: The Place of North America in King George’s World View. Head of Map Collections at the British Library from 2001 to 2015, Mr. Barber has a longstanding research interest in English monarchs and their maps, and he initiated the ongoing British Library project to re-catalog and digitize King George III’s Topographical Collection. In addition to research articles and contributions to scholarly works on medieval world maps and the links between maps and government in early modern Europe, he has curated major exhibitions, acted as a consultant and presenter for television, and authored and edited several popular books on the history of maps.

Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. This program is presented as part of the Lowell Lecture Series and Revolutionary Boston, a citywide commemoration. To see a full list of programs, visit www.bpl.org/revolution.

Revolutionary Boston(R) is the registered trademark of the Bostonian Society and is used by permission.

event roman

The Art of Illustrated Maps

Wednesday, October 21, 2015
5:30 Reception, 6:00 pm Talk
Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

John Roman, Boston-based map illustrator and graduate of New England School of Art & Design correlates not-to-scale-maps as the “the creative nonfiction of cartography” and reveals how and why the human mind accepts the artistic license invoked in imaginative maps.

Program presented in association with the Boston Map Society.

event lit map

Literary Landscapes: Maps from Fiction

February 2 – October 25, 2015

Maps of imaginary places have accompanied literature for centuries. Visualizing the fanciful worlds described in works of fiction sets the stage for events taking place in a story, and often provides insight into the characters themselves. In this exhibition of forty items, visitors will discover maps from a variety of fictional genres, learn how authors create imaginary worlds, and appreciate why descriptive geography is essential to the story. People and creatures, even those who exist only in tales, are related to place, and maps of their imaginary worlds allow readers to be transported into the geography of fantasy.

event am rev

We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence

May 2 to November 29, 2015 – Boston Public Library

2016 – Colonial Williamsburg

2017 – New-York Historical Society

In the spring of 2015 the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center will present an exhibition that commemorates the 250th anniversary of Britain’s 1765 Stamp Act. This pivotal moment sparked American opposition to Britain’s restrictive colonial policies, particularly taxation without representation, which was established to help pay for troops stationed in the colonies during the French and Indian War (1756-1763). Protestors in Boston hung one of the tax collectors in effigy on an elm tree near the Boston Common. The tree became known as the Liberty Tree, and the loose organization of protestors were known as the Sons of Liberty. This early opposition throughout the colonies to British imperial control set the stage for growing opposition to British rule during the next ten years, resulting in the American Revolutionary War.

event liberty tree

Liberty Tree 2015

May 2 – November 29, 2015

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center, Central Library in Copley Square

The Liberty Tree was a real elm tree that once stood on the corner of today’s Essex and Washington Streets in Boston. Colonists gathered there to protest what they felt were unjust taxes imposed on them by the British Parliament in the years leading up to the American Revolution. Other towns in the American colonies also adopted their own liberty trees, and they became a symbol of protest against British rule.

Visitors are invited to join the conversation and share personal responses to the question “What does liberty mean to you?” Hang a leaf on the Liberty Tree at the Central Library in Copley Square or join the #LibertyTreeBPL conversation on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

This program is presented as part of Revolutionary Boston, a citywide commemoration. To see a full list of programs, visit www.bpl.org/revolution.

Revolutionary Boston(R) is the registered trademark of the Bostonian Society and is used by permission.

http://maps.bpl.org/liberty

event women in cartography

Women in Cartography

November 1, 2015 through Spring 2016

This exhibition recognizes and celebrates the long overlooked role of women in the world of mapping; bringing their stories, accomplishments, and most importantly their maps to light. Curated by Alice Hudson, former Chief of the Map Division at the New York Public Library, Women in Cartography showcases the works of better-known women cartographers such as Marie Tharp, who, in partnership with Bruce Heezen, created the first scientific map of the entire ocean floor, and, Agnes Sinclair Holbrook who created the Hull-House maps, statistical cartographic presentations of social data from the immigrant rich Near West Side neighborhoods of Chicago.

event hudson

Celebrating Women in Cartography

Thursday, November 12, 2015
5:30 pm Reception, 6:00 pm Talk
Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Alice Hudson, Curator of Women in Cartography and former Chief of Map Collection at the New York Public Library, talks about women in the world of mapping, bringing their stories, and most importantly, their maps to light.

Program presented in association with the Boston Map Society.

Historical Maps of Boston at the Langham Hotel

Historical Maps of Boston at the Langham Hotel

Langham

A selection of historical maps of New England, Massachusetts, and Boston, describing the topographical transformation of the city over 300 years from the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library are on display at this hotel.

Langham Hotel
250 Franklin Street
Boston, MA

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center (http://maps.bpl.org)