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Upcoming Exhibitions

Back to School: Geography in the Classroom

September 2, 2014 - January 25, 2015

American schoolchildren have studied geography since the colonial-era. Traditionally viewed as an essential subject for boys’ and girls’ education, geography was taught to small children from their earliest lessons at home, to young adults studying in high school and university settings. In this display of forty maps, globes, games, atlases and related objects, we see the evolution of geographic education, examine the visual aids used by teachers in the classroom, and marvel at unique student-produced geography projects from the late 18th to the 20th centuries.

We are One: Mapping the Road from Revolution to Independence

May through November 2015 – Boston
2016 and 2017 – tour to London and U.S. city

In the spring of 2015 the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center will present an exhibition that commemorates the 250th anniversary of Britain’s 1765 Stamp Act. This pivotal moment sparked American opposition to Britain’s restrictive colonial policies, particularly taxation without representation, which was established to help pay for troops stationed in the colonies during the French and Indian War (1756-1763). Protestors in Boston hung one of the tax collectors in effigy on an elm tree near the Boston Common. The tree became known as the Liberty Tree, and the loose organization of protestors were known as the Sons of Liberty. This early opposition throughout the colonies to British imperial control set the stage for growing opposition to British rule during the next ten years, resulting in the American Revolutionary War.

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center (http://maps.bpl.org)