Calendar

Jul 20 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 20 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 20 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm Rabb Hall, Central Library
How do we visualize climate? The Map Center hosts a cross-disciplinary panel discussion about climate visualization, and how different approaches contribute to today’s urgent discourse about climate change. John Anderson, Education Director at the New England Aquarium, will present the Visualizing Change project, a climate change education toolkit that uses “visual narratives” to support informal science learning institutions (aquariums, museums, nature centers, etc.) as they help the public understand the causes, consequences, and appropriate responses to climate change. Catherine D’Ignazio, Assistant Professor of Data Visualization and Civic Media at Emerson College, will discuss her work as an artist and public storyteller, including “Boston Coastline: Future Past,” a “walking data visualization” in which participants traced a route from the Climate Change prediction of the city’s coastline to its history, as a way of physically understanding the city’s future and past. Reverend Mariama White-Hammond, Minister for Ecological Justice and the Interim Youth Pastor at Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, will speak about Mass Interfaith Coalition for Climate Action’s Climate Justice Simulation, an innovative game that asks participants to consider ways to prepare for and respond to a climate event in ways that bring us together, support the most vulnerable, and build on[...]
Jul 21 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 21 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 21 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Discover the amazing collections of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center. Tour the current exhibition, Regions and Seasons: Mapping Climate through History, and also discover historic maps of Boston and the world from 1482 to the present. Tour meets outside the Map Center doors and lasts approximately 30 minutes. Children welcome at parent’s discretion.   *Map Center tours are offered on the first Wednesday and third Friday of every month
Jul 22 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 22 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 23 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 23 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 24 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 24 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 25 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 25 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 26 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 26 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 26 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
 
Jul 27 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 27 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 28 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 28 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 29 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 29 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 30 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 30 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Jul 31 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Jul 31 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Aug 1 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.
Aug 1 all-day Northwest Corridor in front of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Recent immigration has given Boston a new richness of ethnic, language and cultural diversity, with more countries than ever before represented among us. Boston’s foreign-born population, hailing from more than 130 countries, now accounts for 28% of the city’s total population, and the neighborhoods that make up Boston often tell unique stories of diversity and change. This exhibition compares the landscape of today’s “new” Boston with that of over 100 years ago. The maps and graphics on display here show where Boston’s foreign-born residents originate from, and where newer immigrant groups have settled, while celebrating who we are, and the vibrant diversity that is Boston.
Aug 2 all-day Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
The mapping of broad climate zones, wind direction, ocean currents, and related weather events has a long and storied history. In this exhibition, visitors will discover how “Venti” were wind personas who directed ancient ships and “Horae” were goddesses of the seasons who dictated natural order during the 15th-17th centuries, how Enlightenment scientists started to collect and map weather data, and how 19th century geographers reflecting the golden age of thematic cartography created innovative techniques to represent vast amounts of statistical data and developed complex maps furthering our understanding of climatic regions. As visitors explore five centuries of regions and seasons, they can compare this gradual sophistication of mapping climatic data, with the modern use of computers and models to further analyze the impact of changing climatic conditions on future generations.